On College Readiness

February 10, 2011 at 11:35 AM Leave a comment

Critical success factors for a student in college include…

  • Independence – self directed learning, defining one’s own program of study, time management strategy, mining of resources, and quest for knowledge.
  •  Perception – high level of awareness with insight and attention to task as well as strong reading fluency and comprehension. 
  • Communication – excellent writing, tailored to audience and genre, and strong oral and multimedia presentation skills. 
  • Collaboration – the habits of working in study groups, able to organize, convene, and effectively collaborate to increase knowledge and/or deliver group products. 
  • Leadership – solid citizenship in the classroom and decision-making during unstructured time. 
  • Perspective – conversant in the arts and humanities and cognizant of time and context. 
  • Analytics – strong analytical tool kit for application in math and physical and social sciences 
  • Leverage – ability to combine a good general knowledge bank with tools of analysis to achieve understanding and solve problems.
  • Organization – management of materials, processes, and concepts for efficient access and effective use.

 Pedagogy and culture must support students in their readiness to succeed in college, reaching beyond the school as necessary to provide access through productive use of out of school time, dual enrollment programs, and independent study options. Assessment tools must be robust enough to authentically evaluate the many dimensions of student accomplishments.

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Entry filed under: College Readiness, Philosophy. Tags: , .

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